Caution on e-books

An excellent article at Inside Higher Ed suggests librarians need to exercise some caution when moving from print preferred to digital collections. Librarian Daniel Goldstein touches on many issues previously raised by this blog and the need for “e-book ownership to be more closely equivalent to ownership of a physical book than is currently the case”.

He concludes that “we need to renegotiate the way libraries operate in the e-book marketplace so that they can fulfill their unique and irreplaceable functions while also ensuring that publishers and authors receive their due. It will be expensive, if we can ever get there. Books will cost more and libraries will have to develop the infrastructure needed to host, preserve and deliver the books they acquire”.

Advertisements

How Libraries Preserve E-books

Michael Kelley has published an article on Publishers Weekly ‘How Libraries Preserve E-books’, which picks up on many ideas previously discussed by this blog. Robert Wolven, associate university librarian for bibliographic services and collection development at Columbia University is quoted:

‘preservation is the global warming issue for e-books… everyone knows that if we don’t do something now we’ll be in trouble later’.

The article discusses some of the issues faced by libraries with negotiating perpetual accessed to licensed content. The article also considers how digital rights management technology and proprietary e-book formats can make preservation difficult.

Legal deposit for e-books and electronic serials would be a step forward in facilitating ebooks. Currently the US mandates that only electronic only serial publications be deposited at the Library of Congress, with no similar requirement for ebooks. This is problematic with the increasing amount of born digital ebook only titles and with the proliferation of self published e-books entering the market.